Preparation of Manuscripts

Please observe the following points in preparing manuscripts. Papers not conforming closely to these instructions may be returned to their authors for appropriate revision or may be delayed in the review process.

Readability: Manuscripts should be written in clear, concise and grammatically correct English (British or American English throughout). The editors can not undertake wholesale revisions of poorly written papers. Every paper must be free of unnecessary jargon and clearly readable by any specialist of applied ecology or environmental research. The abstract should be written in an explanatory style that will be comprehensible also to readers who are not experts in the subject matter.

General format: The complete paper has to be written preferably in Rich Text Format or in a MS-Word 2003 compatible file, with a maximum of 30 pages including text, figures and tables. Page size: A4, margins: 3 cm on each side, line spacing: single, font type: Times New Roman. Please leave headers and footers unchanged, since it should be filled by the editors.

The order of the material should be as follows: Title, Author(s), Abstract, Keywords, Main text (Introduction, Review of literature, Definitions (if any), Materials and methods, Results, Discussion),  Acknowledgements (if any), References, Appendix (if any). This structure of the main text is not obligatory, but the paper must be logically presented. Footnotes  should be avoided.  The main text must be written with font size 12, justify, first indent 0.5 cm. Within each main section, two levels of subheadings are available and the titles must be with bold, bold and italic, italic respectively.

The manuscript should contain tho whole text, figures, tables and explanations according to the followings (we suggest using the sample of Microsoft Words file):

Title: Should be brief and informative. The title should reflect the most important aspects of the article, in a preferably concise form of not more than 100 characters and spaces. Font size 14, capital letters, center alignment. Style: Title of Paper

By-line: Names (size 11, small capital, Style: Names of Authors) of the authors. No inclusion of scientific titles is necessary. In case of two or more authors, place their names in the same row, separate them with a hyphen (not with a comma) and please indicate the corresponding author with * in superscript. Authors from different institutions must be labelled with numbers in superscript after the names. Addresses of the authors, phone and fax number and e-mail should be also given (size 11, italic, Style: Addresses of Authors).

Abstract: Required for all manuscripts in which the problem, the principal results and conclusions are summarised. The abstract must be self-explanatory, preferably typed in one paragraph and limited to max. 200 words. It should not contain formulas, references or abbreviations. Size 10, only the word Abstract. bold, justify. (Style: Text of Abstract). The Acknowledgements (if any) should also be written in this format.

Keywords: Keywords should not exceed five, not including items appearing in the title. The keywords should be supplied indicating the scope of the paper. Size 10, italic, justify, only the word Keywords must be bold.

Introduction: The introduction must clearly state the problem, the reason for doing the work, the hypotheses or theoretical predictions under consideration and the essential background. It should not contain equations or mathematical notation. Section numbering and headings begin here.

Review of Literature:  A brief survey of the relevant literature, so that a non-specialist reader could understand the significance of the presented results.

Materials and Methods: Provide sufficient details to permit repetition of the experimental work. The technical description of methods should be given when such methods are new.

Results: Results should be presented concisely. Only in exceptional cases will it be permissible to present the same set of results in both table and figure. The results section should not be used for discussion.

Discussion: Point out the significance of the results, and place the results in the context of other work and theoretical background.

Conclusion: Conclusion may review the main points of the paper, do not replicate the abstract as the conclusion. A conclusion might elaborate on the importance of the work or suggest applications and extensions. Authors are strongly encouraged not to call out multiple figures or tables in the conclusion - these should be referenced in the body of the paper.

Acknowledgements: (if any) These should be placed in a separate paragraph at the end of the text, immediately before the list of references. It may include funding information too. Font size 10, the word Acknowledgements. is bold. Use Style: Text of Abstract.

References: In the text references should be cited in American Psychological Association (APA) style (Author, year). Alternatively, the author’s surname may be integrated into the text, followed by the year of publication in parentheses. Cite only essential resources, avoid citing unpublished material. References to papers "in press" must mean that the article has been accepted for publication.

At the end of the paper list references alphabetically by the last name of the first author. Compulsory, list only those references that are cited in the text and prepare this list as an automatically numbered list.

The list should contain names and initials of all of the authors.

[1] Abdullah, J. (2012): City competitiveness and urban sprawl: their implications to socioeconomic and cultural life in Malaysian cities. – Procedia-Social and Behavioral Sciences 50: 20-29.

[2] Barnes, K. B., Morgan III, J. M., Roberge, M. C., Lowe, S. (2001): Sprawl Development. Its Patterns, Consequences and Measurement. A white paper. – Towson University, Maryland.

[3] Behera, D. M., Borate, S. N., Panda, S. N., Behera, P. R., Roy, P. S. (2012): Modelling and analyzing the watershed dynamics using Cellular Automata (CA)–Markov model–A geo-information based approach. – Journal of Earth System Science 121(4): 1011-1024.

[4] Podani, J. (1994): Multivariate Data Analysis in Ecology and Systematics. – SPB Publishing, The Hague.

[5] Thompson, J.N. (1984): Insect Diversity and the Trophic Structure of Communities. – In: Huffaker, C. B. (ed.) Ecological Entomology, Wiley-Interscience, New York.

[6] Tothmeresz, B. (1995): Comparison of different methods for diversity ordering. – Journal of Vegetation Science 6: 283–290.